Examples of Southern American English

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Yeah, we’re in downtown Raleigh.
Yes, we are in the centre of Raleigh.
//jɛ/wir ɪn ˈdɑʊntɑʊn ˈrɔːli/

The rhotic nature of this person's variety of SAE can be herd in the we're sequence. Thus it is no different from General American English Pronunciation.


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I was driving through the center of Atlanta.
//ɑ wəz ˈdrɑːvɪn θruː ðə ˈsenɚ əv æt
ˈlænə//

Notice the pronunciation of centre and Atlanta. The consonant cluster /nt/ is reduced to /n/.


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I haven’t seen my folks in a while.
I haven’t seen my family for a while.
//ɑ ˈhævən siːn mɑː foʊks ɪn a wɑːl//

Just like many accents of English, I is pronounced as a monophthong, in this case, /ɑ/ and not a diphthong as in RP /aɪ/.


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My folks live way over yonder.
My parents live right over there.
//mɑː foʊks lɪv weɪ ˈoʊvɚ ˈjɔndɚ/
/

Notice the pronunciation of my as a long vowel instead of a diphthong /ɑː/. This is typical of this accent.


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My leg hurt.
//mɑː leɪg hɜːts//

The diphthongal pronunciation of leg is typical of this accent.


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He sure is poor.
He is definitely poor.
//hi ʃuːr ɪz pɔɚ//

Compare the pronunciation of poor with RP /pʊə/ or the common American pronunciation /ɔː/ as in the word sure.


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That’s just not my thing.
That’s something I am not interested in.
//ðæts dʒʌst nɑt mɑː θæŋ//

The pronunciation of thing is typical of this kind of accent.


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Y’all are putting me on the spot.
You are all putting me on the spot.
//jɔːlɚ
ʹpʊtən mi ɑn ðə spɑt//

Y'all is a kind of second personal plural address that is one of the most characteristic features of Southern American English.


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He’s something else.
He is incredible.
//hiz ˈsʌmpən ɜls//

There are often alternative pronunciations for pronouns and grammatical words in almost every variety of English. This is the case with something. 


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I made you some sweet tea. Come get you some.
Come and get some.
//ɑ meɪd ju sʌm swiːt tiː//kʌm gɪt ju sʌm//

Notice the /gɪt/ pronunciation of get. 


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The South will rise again.
//ðə sɑʊθ wɪl rɑːz əˈgen//

Notice the monophthongal pronunciation of rise. 


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