Examples of Scottish English

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That’s me doon the road.
I’m off
//ðæts mi dʉn ðə roud//

Notice the /ʉ/ pronunciation of down.


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Are you not coming?    
Aren’t you coming?
//ɑr jə nɒt ˈkʌmɪŋ//

Notice the post-vocalic "r" in are. Most people in England would say: Aren't you coming?


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He doesnae underston me.
He doesn’t understand me.
//hi ˈdʌzne ɒnerˈstɒn miː//

Notice the pronunciation of what would be doesn't in Standard English: /ˈdʌzne/


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The weins wouldnae stop greetin’
The children would not stop crying.
//ðə weɪnz ˈwʊdne stɒp ˈgritən//

The negative ending in wouldnae is the same as doesnae in the last example. This is characteristic of Scottish English.


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Do you ken Angus - I'm scunner wi’ I’im 
Do you know Angus? I’m angry with him.
//də jə ken ˈæŋgəs/ ɑm ˈskʌnər wi ɪm//

Notice the shortening of wi /wi/. A word similar to scunner is found in Northern Ireland.


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Oh, he's a bonny wee bairn.

He’s a lovely, little child.
//o/hiz ə ˈbɒni wiː bɜrn//
The word bonny and bairn are also found in Newcastle.

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Ay, I'll gee you a run in the car.
Yes, I will give you a lift in the car.
//ai/ʌil giː jə ə rʌn ɪn ðə kɑːr//

Ay, meaning yes is also found in the North of England. Notice the shortened ending of gi = give.


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Hi, I'm from Glasgow or as some people say “Glasgae”.
//hʌi/ɑm frɒm ˈglæzgo/ɔr əz sʌm ˈpipəl sei/ˈglæzgei/

The pronunciation of  I am as /ɑm/ is common not only in Scotland but in many parts of the UK.